1. Hans Gremmen on photobook design

     
     
  2. Looking at photobooks, looking at how details matter: Forms and Functions of Photobooks - part 1 and part 2

     

  3. fabulousmrfrost:

    conscientious:

    mikepetersphoto:

    conscientious:

    mikepetersphoto:

    On Saturday in Bryant Park in NYC I had photographed a man using a cell phone on a retractable arm to make a video of himself, his wife and their child. It was nothing special really, I had been photographing photographers shooting and looking at photographs throughout my travels that day, so it…

    Once again, while it might be legal to photograph people in public against their will, the real question is whether it is ethical to do so, in particular in a case where someone asks to have the photograph deleted. See my piece on the ethics of street photography.

    Ethics. A worthwhile discussion for sure. I tried to educate the man about the fact that there were museums filled with photographs made by photographers on the street. I did invite the man to look at my web site so he could get a better understanding of what I was doing. I did attempt to inform the man about case law. He was dismissive and persistent in my being wrong.

    If he had a legitimate concern, then I would have listened. But, I would still have decided on my own that the choice to keep or discard the image was mine alone and would be based on the merits of the image, and if his story worth while, I would take that into consideration also. 

    In my many years of photographing on the street, this is only the second time anyone has asked me to delete a photo. If people are willing to listen, I do tell them that I photograph on the street as a means of expressing how I feel about the times in which I live through what I see and what I’m drawn to photograph. In this case, the man was not interested in what I had to say as he was too invested in being right.

    For reasons of completeness, here’s Mike’s response. As far as I am concerned, the man did have a legitimate concern, which, btw, has nothing to do with what’s in museums or the law.

    I’m always fascinated by how these conversations disregard the fact that all day we’re each being recorded, cataloged, and analyzed by the massive number of video surveillance cameras perching from street poles and poking out from under shop awnings. If anything, these cameras are more ethically dubious, highly suspect, and worthy of questioning than someone “expressing how [they] feel about the times in which [they] live through what [they] see and what [they’re] drawn to photograph”

    Well, do question those cameras. But the fact that those cameras are more dubious ethically does not magically take away from your own ethical problem.

    I mean you can’t be bothered by all the surveillance, and then dismiss it when other people are bothered by you photographing them.

    The solution seems rather obvious: pay close attention to other people, if they don’t want to be photographed don’t do it, and by setting an example you’re in a much better spot to complain about you being photographed by surveillance cameras.

     

  4. mikepetersphoto:

    conscientious:

    mikepetersphoto:

    On Saturday in Bryant Park in NYC I had photographed a man using a cell phone on a retractable arm to make a video of himself, his wife and their child. It was nothing special really, I had been photographing photographers shooting and looking at photographs throughout my travels that day, so it…

    Once again, while it might be legal to photograph people in public against their will, the real question is whether it is ethical to do so, in particular in a case where someone asks to have the photograph deleted. See my piece on the ethics of street photography.

    Ethics. A worthwhile discussion for sure. I tried to educate the man about the fact that there were museums filled with photographs made by photographers on the street. I did invite the man to look at my web site so he could get a better understanding of what I was doing. I did attempt to inform the man about case law. He was dismissive and persistent in my being wrong.

    If he had a legitimate concern, then I would have listened. But, I would still have decided on my own that the choice to keep or discard the image was mine alone and would be based on the merits of the image, and if his story worth while, I would take that into consideration also. 

    In my many years of photographing on the street, this is only the second time anyone has asked me to delete a photo. If people are willing to listen, I do tell them that I photograph on the street as a means of expressing how I feel about the times in which I live through what I see and what I’m drawn to photograph. In this case, the man was not interested in what I had to say as he was too invested in being right.

    For reasons of completeness, here’s Mike’s response. As far as I am concerned, the man did have a legitimate concern, which, btw, has nothing to do with what’s in museums or the law.

     

  5. mikepetersphoto:

    On Saturday in Bryant Park in NYC I had photographed a man using a cell phone on a retractable arm to make a video of himself, his wife and their child. It was nothing special really, I had been photographing photographers shooting and looking at photographs throughout my travels that day, so it…

    Once again, while it might be legal to photograph people in public against their will, the real question is whether it is ethical to do so, in particular in a case where someone asks to have the photograph deleted. See my piece on the ethics of street photography.

     
  6. Forms and Functions of Photobooks (part 1): Thinking about how photobooks work by looking more closely at how they’re constructed and at how that form is related to their content.

     

  7. ozzysuazo said: I agree with a recent comment you made about insubstantial work on Tumblr. I have a few questions for you though. What are your views on what makes a good photo book? Do you believe photojournalists can abide by the values of objectivity? How much of what you see affects your personal decisions outside of photography?

    khalikallah:

    #1. There’s tremendous work, and insubstantial work, throughout tumblr. No disrespect to anyone regarding my earlier comment. #2. I feel it’s impossible for any photographer to maintain objectivity. The photographer always has a literal point of view, camera choice, light choice, and many other choices; by default these choices will always make it a subjective form. Subjectivity doesn’t diminish the power a photograph may contain. #3. I live this. I neither think outside or inside of photography. Seeing is a way of life, and photography is an addition to the way I see.  My personal decisions are affected by my moral understanding, and tempered by my spiritual development. Thank you. Peace! Oh yeah. . #4. A good photo-book, to me, has a definite theme, rhythm, uniqueness… something that can flip my mind about photography and leave me thinking, “Wow, I didn’t know you could do that!”

     
  8. ucresearch:

    An invisible force at the center of our galaxy


    Scientists have theorized that our Milky Way galaxy has a super massive black hole at the center of it, but how did this idea come about?  How do astronomers measure something that has actually never been seen in our telescopes?

    Above is an animation of star movements in our galaxy over the past 16 years.  They all orbit around a point that emits no light in our galaxy.  We can measure the mass of these stars and calculate that their orbits require an object with the mass of 4 million Suns.  So far this points to a super massive black hole in our galaxy.

    Read more about how galaxies obtain these supermassive objects →

     

  9. clientsfromhell:

    Client: I need a quote for my book.

    Me: I’ll be happy to offer a quote, ma’am. Can you tell me a little about your book and the services you would like, please?

    Client: It’s just a book.

    Me: Yes, I understand, but there are many different kinds of books: fiction, non-fiction, technical,…

     
  10. weirdvintage:

    Haruo Nakajima and Momoko Kôchi on the set of Godzilla (Gojira), 1954 (via This Is Not Porn)

     
  11. un-gif-dans-ta-gueule:

    Transcendance - Wally Pfister

     
  12. eyecurious:

    W.G. Sebald on photographs (via caille)

    As the world has slowly woken up to the genius of W.G. Sebald’s project there’s been an explosion of critical interest in his work, and the use of photographs in his work. I’ve read most of it and all I’ll say is that I’d much rather watch Max talk about it himself. Thank goodness for the existence of this very short clip, found and yanked out of the stream of history just like Sebald’s photos.

     
     

  13. fette:

    Molly Lambert, No Country for Old Pervs: The Fall of the Houses of Terry Richardson and Dov Charney, for Grantland, July 2014.

     

  14. douglaslowell:

    image

    Opening Erotos by Nobuyoshi Araki (1993) is like finding a door in your home that you never saw before and walking through it.

    image

    It doesn’t feel exactly like any other Araki book I’m familiar with (and, just as I have not counted all the grains of sand at the beach, I have not seen all…

    One of my favourite books as well. The idea is very simple, and it’s unbelievably well executed, with some truly stunning imagery.

     
  15. shihlun:

    FACT 24: A Factory Quartet (1980)

    Design: Tony Wilson & Peter  Saville

    Photography: Tony Wilson (Polaroid)